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Australian Journal of Defence and Strategic Studies

Australian Journal of Defence and Strategic Studies

Volume 4, Number 1 (2022)

COMMENTARY

Ransomware 2.0: an emerging threat to national security

Mohiuddin Ahmed, Sascha Dov Bachmann, Abu Barkat Ullah and Shaun Barnett

DOI: https://doi.org/10.51174/AJDSS.0401/EMQH2521

EXTRACT

The global Covid-19 pandemic has seen the rapid evolution of our traditional working environment; more people are working from home and the number of online meetings has increased. This trend has also affected the security sector. Consequently, the evolution of ransomware to what is now being described as ‘Ransomware 2.0’ has governments, businesses and individuals alike rushing to secure their data.

Australia, as an open market economy and democracy, is both dependent and reliant on the internet and online security for our prosperity, way of life and the functioning of our democracy. Cyber security as a prerequisite for our ever-increasing interconnectivity is under assault from cyber attacks and malicious cyber activity being conducted by states and ‘hybrid actors’, such as cyber criminals and syndicates. Australia’s Cyber Security Strategy 2020 identified these threats as posing a risk Australia’s national security, social cohesion and prosperity, stating: ‘Well-equipped and persistent state-sponsored actors are targeting critical infrastructure and stealing our intellectual property.’ 1 Consequently in 2021, the Australian Government launched its Ransomware Action Plan to ‘ensure that Australia remains a hard target for cybercriminals’. 2 This short commentary provides a short overview of Ransomware 2.0 threats to our cybersecurity and online safety, which can have serious implications for our national security.

Ransomware 2.0 is a relatively new concept and employs a ‘double extortion’ model, where a ransom must be paid to prevent both data loss and data leakage. Many new and improved detection techniques that have been developed for traditional ransomware are beneficial in this new ever-changing threat landscape. These include tools such as EldeRan, RansomWall and RansHunt, which possess features and capabilities that are essential in the early identification and eradication of ransomware.

Ransomware 2.0: an emerging threat to national security [PDF 38 KB]

Published online: 8 July 2022

Last Updated: 27 July 2022

To cite this article:

Please consult the citation requirements of your university or publication.

Australian Government Style: Documentary-note
Mohiuddin Ahmed, Sascha Dov Bachmann, Abu Barkat Ullah and Shaun Barnett, ‘Ransomware 2.0: an emerging threat to national security’, Australian Journal of Defence and Strategic Studies, 2022, 4(1):125-132. https://doi.org/10.51174/AJDSS.0401/EMQH2521

Australian Government Style: Author-date
Ahmed M, Bachmann SD, Ullah AB and Barnett S (2022) ‘Ransomware 2.0: an emerging threat to national security’, Australian Journal of Defence and Strategic Studies, 4(1):125-132. https://doi.org/10.51174/AJDSS.0401/EMQH2521

The following can be used as guidelines. For further information, see the Australian Government Style Manual at https://www.stylemanual.gov.au/style-rules-and-conventions/referencing-and-attribution






1 Peter Dutton MP, ‘Minister’s Foreword’, Australia’s Cyber Security Strategy 2020, Department of Home Affairs: Australian Government, Canberra, 2020, p 4. https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/about-us/our-portfolios/cyber-security/strategy/australia%E2%80%99s-cyber-security-strategy-2020


2 Department of Home Affairs (Home Affairs), Ransonware Action Plan, Australian Government, Barton ACT, 2021, p 6. https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/about-us/our-portfolios/cyber-security/strategy/australias-ransomware-action-plan